Benzo[ghi]perylene

B[ghi]P; 1,12-Benzoperylene; formula: C22H12; CAS Registry Number: 191-24-2
Structure of benzo[ghi]perylene
Source: PubChem
Identifier: CID 9117
URL: https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/9117#section=2D-Structure

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with six connected six-membered rings

Benzo[g,h,i]perylene occurs naturally in crude oil and coal tar and is ubiquitous as product of incomplete combustion. It is found, e.g., in cigarette smoke, automobile exhausts and emissions from industry, charbroiled meat, edible oils and in soils, groundwater and surface waters.

In the atmosphere, Benzo[g,h,i]perylene is adsorbed to particles. It enters soils and waters through wet and dry deposition. Bound to particles its degradation is low.

Benzo[g,h,i]perylene accumulates strongly in the environment and in organisms. It is suspected to be mutagenic. Due to lack of data, toxicity and carcinogenicity can not be evaluated. There is, however, some indication for carcinogenicity.

Benzo[g,h,i]perylene is one of 16 PAHs which were included in the EPA-list of ‘Priority Pollutants’ and is on the EU-list of PAH recommended for monitoring.

Specimen

  • Common mussel species as invasive animal in rivers and lakes with high information level for water pollution
  • Fine insoluble mineral or organic particles in the water phase
  • One of the most important edible mussel species common in the North and Baltic Sea
  • A major primary producer in semi-natural and anthropogenic affected ecosystems.
  • A major primary producer in semi-natural and anthropogenic affected ecosystems.
  • A deciduous tree typical of ecosystems close to dense conurbations and an indicator for the characterisation of the immission situation during the vegetation period.
  • As the most dominant deciduous tree species in Central Europe, it plays a significant role in most nearly natural and also anthropogenically influenced forest ecosystems up to an altitude of 1100 m.
  • As an organism living at ground level, it is a major driver of the decomposition of organic material (e.g. plant litter).
  • As an organism living at ground level, it is a major driver of the decomposition of organic material (e.g. plant litter).
  • Soil is livelihood and biosphere for humans, animals, plants and soil organisms. All the substances brought in are transported, transformed and/or accumulated in the soil.

Sampling area

Sampling period

1985 - 2019