Dechloranes

E.g. Dechlorane Plus®: formula: C18H12Cl12 ; CAS Registry Number: 13560-89-9
Structure of Dechlorane Plus®
Source: PubChem
Identifier: CID 26111
URL: https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/26111#section=2D-Structure

Chlorinated flame retardants

Dechlorane Plus®, first used as a substitute for the pesticide Mirex, is a high-production volume chemical that consists of two isomers (syn and anti). In the technical mixture, the anti-isomer accounts for approximately 60 to 80% of the total isomers. Anti-Cl11-Dechlorane Plus (Cl11-Anti-DP) and anti-Cl10-Dechlorane Plus (Cl10-anti-DP) are examples for degradation products of Dechlorane Plus® after dechlorination. 1,5-Dechlorane Plus® Mono-Adduct is a transformation product (Diels Alder adduct) of Dechlorane Plus®. Dechlorane 602, Dechlorane 603 and Dechlorane 604 are similar substances to Dechlorane Plus®, also being replacement substances for Mirex.
Dechlorane Plus® is a potential substitute for DecaBDE and suspected to be highly persistent, to show biomagnification and potential for long-range transport.

Substances

Specimen

  • Common mussel species as invasive animal in rivers and lakes with high information level for water pollution
  • Bioindicator in rivers and lakes
  • Fine insoluble mineral or organic particles in the water phase
  • One of the most important edible mussel species common in the North and Baltic Sea
  • As the only viviparous fish in German nearshore waters, it is a bioindicator in nearshore coastal marine ecosystems.
  • Inshore, the herring gull mainly feeds from the sea: upon fish, mussels, and crabs.
  • A major primary producer in semi-natural and anthropogenic affected ecosystems.
  • A major primary producer in semi-natural and anthropogenic affected ecosystems.
  • A deciduous tree typical of ecosystems close to dense conurbations and an indicator for the characterisation of the immission situation during the vegetation period.
  • As the most dominant deciduous tree species in Central Europe, it plays a significant role in most nearly natural and also anthropogenically influenced forest ecosystems up to an altitude of 1100 m.
  • The roe deer is the most common of the larger herbivores (first order-consumer) to be found in the wild in Europe.
  • As an organism living at ground level, it is a major driver of the decomposition of organic material (e.g. plant litter).
  • As an organism living at ground level, it is a major driver of the decomposition of organic material (e.g. plant litter).
  • Soil is livelihood and biosphere for humans, animals, plants and soil organisms. All the substances brought in are transported, transformed and/or accumulated in the soil.

Sampling area

Sampling period

1985 - 2016